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100 SELECTED REFERENCES

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1. Buchner, F.L., et al.,
Fruits and vegetables consumption and the risk of histological subtypes of lung cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).
Cancer Causes Control, 2009.

2. Islami, F., et al.,
Pickled vegetables and the risk of oesophageal cancer: a meta-analysis. Br J Cancer, 2009. 101(9): p. 1641-7.

3. Lin, J., et al.,
Dietary intake of vegetables and fruits and the modification effects of GSTM1 and NAT2 genotypes on bladder cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2009. 18(7): p. 2090-7.

4. Lee, J.E., et al.,
Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and carotenoids and renal cell cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 13 prospective studies.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2009. 18(6): p. 1730-9.

5. van Duijnhoven, F.J., et al.,
Fruit, vegetables, and colorectal cancer risk: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Am J Clin Nutr, 2009. 89(5): p. 1441-52.

6. Davidson, P.G. and R. Touger-Decker,
Chemopreventive role of fruits and vegetables in oropharyngeal cancer.
Nutr Clin Pract, 2009. 24(2): p. 250-60.

7. Yeh, M., et al.,
Higher intakes of vegetables and vegetable-related nutrients are associated with lower endometrial cancer risks.
J Nutr, 2009. 139(2): p. 317-22.

8. Galeone, C., et al.,
Allium vegetables intake and endometrial cancer risk.
Public Health Nutr, 2009. 12(9): p. 1576-9.

9. Bin Hafeez, B., et al.,
Delphinidin, a dietary anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables: a new weapon to blunt prostate cancer growth. Cell Cycle,
2008. 7(21): p. 3320-6.

10. Wright, M.E., et al.,
Intakes of fruit, vegetables, and specific botanical groups in relation to lung cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.
Am J Epidemiol, 2008. 168(9): p. 1024-34.

11. Yun, J.M., et al.,
Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin in pigmented fruits and vegetables, induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human colon cancer HCT116 cells.
Mol Carcinog, 2009. 48(3): p. 260-70.

12. Tang, L., et al.,
Consumption of raw cruciferous vegetables is inversely associated with bladder cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2008. 17(4): p. 938-44.

13. Nothlings, U., et al.,
Intake of vegetables, legumes, and fruit, and risk for all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in a European diabetic population.
 J Nutr, 2008. 138(4): p. 775-81.

14. Lee, S.A., et al.,
Cruciferous vegetables, the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic polymorphism, and breast cancer risk.
Am J Clin Nutr, 2008. 87(3): p. 753-60.

15. Dosil-Diaz, O., et al.,
Consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of lung cancer: a case-control study in Galicia, Spain.
Nutrition, 2008. 24(5): p. 407-13.

16. Arikawa, A.Y. and D.D. Gallaher,
Cruciferous vegetables reduce morphological markers of colon cancer risk in dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.
J Nutr, 2008. 138(3): p. 526-32.

17. Do, M.H., et al.,
Fruits, vegetables, soy foods and breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal Korean women: a case-control study.
Int J Vitam Nutr Res, 2007. 77(2): p. 130-41.

18. Do, M.H., et al.,
Intake of fruits, vegetables, and soy foods in relation to breast cancer risk in Korean women: a case-control study.
Nutr Cancer, 2007. 57(1): p. 20-7.

19. Sacerdote, C., et al.,
Intake of fruits and vegetables and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes in bladder cancer.
Mutagenesis, 2007. 22(4): p. 281-5.

20. Higdon, J.V., et al.,
Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis.
Pharmacol Res, 2007. 55(3): p. 224-36.

21. Lee, J.E., et al.,
Intakes of fruits, vegetables, vitamins A, C, and E, and carotenoids and risk of renal cell cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2006. 15(12): p. 2445-52.

22. Boeing, H., et al.,
Intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of cancer of the upper aero-digestive tract: the prospective EPIC-study.
Cancer Causes Control, 2006. 17(7): p. 957-69.

23. Kelemen, L.E., et al.,
Vegetables, fruit, and antioxidant-related nutrients and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a National Cancer Institute-Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based case-control study.
Am J Clin Nutr, 2006. 83(6): p. 1401-10.

24. Skuladottir, H., et al.,
Does high intake of fruit and vegetables improve lung cancer survival?
Lung Cancer, 2006. 51(3): p. 267-73.

25 Fighting cancer at the grocery store. Research shows broccoli sprouts, cabbage, garlic, among other vegetables, contain anti-cancer properties. Health News, 2006. 12(1): p. 10-1.

26. Sunny, L.,
A low fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 2005. 6(4): p. 490-6.

27. Weikert, S., et al.,
Fruits and vegetables and renal cell carcinoma: findings from the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC).
Int J Cancer, 2006. 118(12): p. 3133-9.

28. Setiawan, V.W., et al.,
Allium vegetables and stomach cancer risk in China.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 2005. 6(3): p. 387-95.

29. Zickute, J., et al.,
[Vegetables and fruits and risk of stomach cancer].
Medicina (Kaunas), 2005. 41(9): p. 733-40.

30. Hayes, D.P.,
The protective role of fruits and vegetables against radiation-induced cancer.
Nutr Rev, 2005. 63(9): p. 303-11.

31. Cooke, D., et al.,
Anthocyans from fruits and vegetables--does bright colour signal cancer chemopreventive activity?
Eur J Cancer, 2005. 41(13): p. 1931-40.

32. Wark, P.A., et al.,
Fruits, vegetables, and hMLH1 protein-deficient and -proficient colon cancer: The Netherlands cohort study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2005. 14(7): p. 1619-25.

33. Joseph, M.A., et al.,
Cruciferous vegetables, genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1, and prostate cancer risk.
Nutr Cancer, 2004. 50(2): p. 206-13.

34. de Vogel, J., et al.,
Green vegetables, red meat and colon cancer: chlorophyll prevents the cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects of haem in rat colon.
Carcinogenesis, 2005. 26(2): p. 387-93.

35. Sengupta, A., S. Ghosh, and S. Bhattacharjee,
Allium vegetables in cancer prevention: an overview.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev, 2004. 5(3): p. 237-45.

36. Gaudet, M.M., et al.,
Fruits, vegetables, and micronutrients in relation to breast cancer modified by menopause and hormone receptor status.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2004. 13(9): p. 1485-94.

37. Link, L.B. and J.D. Potter,
Raw versus cooked vegetables and cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2004. 13(9): p. 1422-35.

38. Rahmat, A., et al.,
Determination of total antioxidant activity in three types of local vegetables shoots and the cytotoxic effect of their ethanolic extracts against different cancer cell lines.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr, 2004. 13(3): p. 308-11.

39. Skuladottir, H., et al.,
Does insufficient adjustment for smoking explain the preventive effects of fruit and vegetables on lung cancer?
Lung Cancer, 2004. 45(1): p. 1-10.

40. Keck, A.S. and J.W. Finley,
Cruciferous vegetables: cancer protective mechanisms of glucosinolate hydrolysis products and selenium.
Integr Cancer Ther, 2004. 3(1): p. 5-12.

41. Chiao, J.W., et al.,
Ingestion of an isothiocyanate metabolite from cruciferous vegetables inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cell xenografts by apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.
Carcinogenesis, 2004. 25(8): p. 1403-8.

42. Chen, M.S., D. Chen, and Q.P. Dou,
Inhibition of proteasome activity by various fruits and vegetables is associated with cancer cell death.
In Vivo, 2004. 18(1): p. 73-80.

43. Pierce, J.P., et al.,
Telephone counseling intervention increases intakes of micronutrient- and phytochemical-rich vegetables, fruit and fiber in breast cancer survivors.
J Nutr, 2004. 134(2): p. 452-8.

44. Hara, M., et al.,
Cruciferous vegetables, mushrooms, and gastrointestinal cancer risks in a multicenter, hospital-based case-control study in Japan.
Nutr Cancer, 2003. 46(2): p. 138-47.

45. Miller, A.B., et al.,
Fruits and vegetables and lung cancer: Findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.
Int J Cancer, 2004. 108(2): p. 269-76

46. Smith-Warner, S.A., et al.,
Fruits, vegetables and lung cancer: a pooled analysis of cohort studies.
Int J Cancer, 2003. 107(6): p. 1001-11.

47. Rahmat, A., et al.,
Determination of total antioxidant activity in three types of local vegetables shoots and the cytotoxic effect of their ethanolic extracts against different cancer cell lines.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr, 2003. 12(3): p. 292-5.

48. Riboli, E. and T. Norat,
Epidemiologic evidence of the protective effect of fruit and vegetables on cancer risk.
Am J Clin Nutr, 2003. 78(3 Suppl): p. 559S-569S.

49. Finley, J.W.,
The antioxidant responsive element (ARE) may explain the protective effects of cruciferous vegetables on cancer.
Nutr Rev, 2003. 61(7): p. 250-4.

50. Srivastava, S.K., et al.,
Allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, inhibits growth of PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo.
Carcinogenesis, 2003. 24(10): p. 1665-70.

51. Xiao, D., et al.,
Allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, inhibits proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by causing G2/M arrest and inducing apoptosis.
Carcinogenesis, 2003. 24(5): p. 891-7.

52. Temple, N.J. and K.K. Gladwin,
Fruit, vegetables, and the prevention of cancer: research challenges.
Nutrition, 2003. 19(5): p. 467-70.

53. Wright, M.E., et al.,
Dietary carotenoids, vegetables, and lung cancer risk in women: the Missouri women's health study (United States).
Cancer Causes Control, 2003. 14(1): p. 85-96.

54. Malin, A.S., et al.,
Intake of fruits, vegetables and selected micronutrients in relation to the risk of breast cancer.
Int J Cancer, 2003. 105(3): p. 413-8.

55. Neuhouser, M.L., et al.,
Fruits and vegetables are associated with lower lung cancer risk only in the placebo arm of the beta-carotene and retinol efficacy trial (CARET).
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2003. 12(4): p. 350-8.

56. Sauvaget, C., et al.,
Vegetables and fruit intake and cancer mortality in the Hiroshima/Nagasaki Life Span Study.
Br J Cancer, 2003. 88(5): p. 689-94.

57. Maynard, M., et al.,
Fruit, vegetables, and antioxidants in childhood and risk of adult cancer: the Boyd Orr cohort.
J Epidemiol Community Health, 2003. 57(3): p. 218-25.

58. Hsing, A.W., et al.,
Allium vegetables and risk of prostate cancer: a population-based study.
J Natl Cancer Inst, 2002. 94(21): p. 1648-51.

59. Serafini, M., et al.,
Total antioxidant potential of fruit and vegetables and risk of gastric cancer.
Gastroenterology, 2002. 123(4): p. 985-91.

60. Kobayashi, M., et al.,
Vegetables, fruit and risk of gastric cancer in Japan: a 10-year follow-up of the JPHC Study Cohort I.
Int J Cancer, 2002. 102(1): p. 39-44.

61. Oesophageal cancer may be caused by fertilizer used on vegetables and fruits.
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl), 2002. 11(2): p. 76.

62. Murillo, G. and R.G. Mehta,
Cruciferous vegetables and cancer prevention.
Nutr Cancer, 2001. 41(1-2): p. 17-28.

63. Smith-Warner, S.A., et al.,
Fruits, vegetables, and adenomatous polyps: the Minnesota Cancer Prevention Research Unit case-control study.
Am J Epidemiol, 2002. 155(12): p. 1104-13.

64. Gerber, M., et al.,
[Food and cancer: state of the art about the protective effect of fruits and vegetables].
Bull Cancer, 2002. 89(3): p. 293-312.

65. Hill, M.J.,
Vegetables, fruits, fibre and colorectal cancer.
Eur J Cancer Prev, 2002. 11(1): p. 1-2.

66. La Vecchia, C., A. Altieri, and A. Tavani,
Vegetables, fruit, antioxidants and cancer: a review of Italian studies.
Eur J Nutr, 2001. 40(6): p. 261-7.

67. Zeegers, M.P., R.A. Goldbohm, and P.A. van den Brandt,
Consumption of vegetables and fruits and urothelial cancer incidence: a prospective study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2001. 10(11): p. 1121-8.

68. Bianchini, F. and H. Vainio,
Allium vegetables and organosulfur compounds: do they help prevent cancer?
Environ Health Perspect, 2001. 109(9): p. 893-902.

69. Terry, P., et al.,
Fruit, vegetables, dietary fiber, and risk of colorectal cancer.
J Natl Cancer Inst, 2001. 93(7): p. 525-33.

70. Kolonel, L.N., et al.,
Vegetables, fruits, legumes and prostate cancer: a multiethnic case-control study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 2000. 9(8): p. 795-804.

71. Zurcher, G.,
[New knowledge about cancer and nutrition. 5 servings of fruit and vegetables per day prevent cancer].
MMW Fortschr Med, 1999. 141(38): p. 40-3.

72. van't Veer, P., et al.,
Fruits and vegetables in the prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease.
Public Health Nutr, 2000. 3(1): p. 103-7.

73. Cox, B.D., M.J. Whichelow, and A.T. Prevost,
Seasonal consumption of salad vegetables and fresh fruit in relation to the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer.
Public Health Nutr, 2000. 3(1): p. 19-29.

74. van Poppel, G., et al.,
Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms.
Adv Exp Med Biol, 1999. 472: p. 159-68.

75. Ronco, A., et al.,
Vegetables, fruits, and related nutrients and risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Uruguay.
Nutr Cancer, 1999. 35(2): p. 111-9

76. Takezaki, T., et al.,
Comparative study of lifestyles of residents in high and low risk areas for gastric cancer in Jiangsu Province, China; with special reference to allium vegetables.
J Epidemiol, 1999. 9(5): p. 297-305.

77. Gao, C.M., et al.,
Protective effect of allium vegetables against both esophageal and stomach cancer: a simultaneous case-referent study of a high-epidemic area in Jiangsu Province, China. Jpn J
Cancer Res, 1999. 90(6): p. 614-21.

78. Shapiro, T.A., et al.,
Human metabolism and excretion of cancer chemoprotective glucosinolates and isothiocyanates of cruciferous vegetables.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 1998. 7(12): p. 1091-100.

79. Blomhoff, R.,
[Fruit and vegetables in the prevention of cancer].
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen, 1998. 118(22): p. 3462-5.

80. Djuric, Z., et al.,
Oxidative DNA damage levels in blood from women at high risk for breast cancer are associated with dietary intakes of meats, vegetables, and fruits.
J Am Diet Assoc, 1998. 98(5): p. 524-8.

81. Franceschi, S., et al.,
Role of different types of vegetables and fruit in the prevention of cancer of the colon, rectum, and breast.
Epidemiology, 1998. 9(3): p. 338-41.

82. Terry, P., O. Nyren, and J. Yuen,
Protective effect of fruits and vegetables on stomach cancer in a cohort of Swedish twins. Int J
Cancer, 1998. 76(1): p. 35-7.

83. La Vecchia, C. and A. Tavani,
Fruit and vegetables, and human cancer.
Eur J Cancer Prev, 1998. 7(1): p. 3-8.

84. Moreau-Stodola, D.,
Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: the Wisconsin 5 a day for better health initiative.
Wis Med J, 1997. 96(4): p. 39-41.

85. Ohigashi, H., A. Murakami, and K. Koshimizu,
An approach to functional food: cancer preventive potential of vegetables and fruits and their active constituents.
Nutr Rev, 1996. 54(11 Pt 2): p. S24-8.

86. Steinmetz, K.A. and J.D. Potter,
Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a review.
J Am Diet Assoc, 1996. 96(10): p. 1027-39.

87. Verhoeven, D.T., et al.,
Epidemiological studies on brassica vegetables and cancer risk.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 1996. 5(9): p. 733-48.

88. Wargovich, M.J., et al.,
Allium vegetables: their role in the prevention of cancer.
Biochem Soc Trans, 1996. 24(3): p. 811-4.

89. Freudenheim, J.L., et al.,
Premenopausal breast cancer risk and intake of vegetables, fruits, and related nutrients.
J Natl Cancer Inst, 1996. 88(6): p. 340-8.

90. Wargovich, M.J. and N. Uda,
Allium vegetables and the potential for chemoprevention of cancer.
Adv Exp Med Biol, 1996. 401: p. 171-7.

91. Deneo-Pellegrini, H., E. De Stefani, and A. Ronco,
Vegetables, fruits, and risk of colorectal cancer: a case-control study from Uruguay.
Nutr Cancer, 1996. 25(3): p. 297-304.

92. Elson, C.E. and S.G. Yu,
The chemoprevention of cancer by mevalonate-derived constituents of fruits and vegetables.
J Nutr, 1994. 124(5): p. 607-14.

93. Steinmetz, K.A., et al.,
Vegetables, fruit, and colon cancer in the Iowa Women's Health Study.
Am J Epidemiol, 1994. 139(1): p. 1-15.

94. Gao, C.M., et al.,
Protective effects of raw vegetables and fruit against lung cancer among smokers and ex-smokers: a case-control study in the Tokai area of Japan.
Jpn J Cancer Res, 1993. 84(6): p. 594-600.

95. Dorgan, J.F., et al.,
Race and sex differences in associations of vegetables, fruits, and carotenoids with lung cancer risk in New Jersey (United States).
Cancer Causes Control, 1993. 4(3): p. 273-81.

96. Dragsted, L.O., M. Strube, and J.C. Larsen,
Cancer-protective factors in fruits and vegetables: biochemical and biological background.
Pharmacol Toxicol, 1993. 72 Suppl 1: p. 116-35.

97. Forman, M.R., et al.,
The effect of dietary intake of fruits and vegetables on the odds ratio of lung cancer among Yunnan tin miners.
Int J Epidemiol, 1992. 21(3): p. 437-41.

98. Cheng, K.K., et al.,
Pickled vegetables in the aetiology of oesophageal cancer in Hong Kong Chinese.
Lancet, 1992. 339(8805): p. 1314-8.

99. Block, G., B. Patterson, and A. Subar,
Fruit, vegetables, and cancer prevention: a review of the epidemiological evidence.
Nutr Cancer, 1992. 18(1): p. 1-29.

100. Steinmetz, K.A. and J.D. Potter,
Vegetables, fruit, and cancer. II. Mechanisms.
Cancer Causes Control, 1991. 2(6): p. 427-42.

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